Scrum Master Tips and Tricks, Part One

Safe Business Agility

While lots of people are still working remotely, some are returning to company offices, which is creating hybrid team environments. Learn what this new normal means for collaboration within Agile teams, and scrum master tips and tricks for hybrid team engagement.

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While lots of people are still working remotely, some are returning to company offices, creating hybrid team environments. What does this new normal mean for collaboration within Agile teams? We turned to two of our scrum masters, Madi Fisher and Sam Ervin, to find out. We also asked them for some tips and tricks about coaching non-development teams in adopting Agile.

Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Guest: Maadi Fisher

Madi is the scrum master for the Information Technology and SAFe® Collaborate teams

Madi is the scrum master for the Information Technology and SAFe® Collaborate teams at Scaled Agile. She believes in the power of people and what they can accomplish as a team. And she loves being the glue that helps teams stick to a common goal—all while having fun. Madi’s secret sauce mixes the spirit of collaboration, a shared vision, and being customer centric.

Learn more about Madi on LinkedIn

Guest: Sam Ervin

Sam Ervin is a certified SAFe® 5.0 Program Consultant

Sam is a certified SAFe® 5.0 Program Consultant (SPC) and serves as the scrum master for several teams at Scaled Agile. His recent career highlights include entertaining the crowd as the co-host of the 2019 and 2020 Global SAFe® Summits. A native of Columbia, South Carolina, Sam lives in Denver, CO, where he enjoys CrossFit and Olympic weightlifting.

Learn more about Sam on LinkedIn

How I Prepared to Teach My First Remote SAFe Class

Teach My First Remote SAFe Class

In March 2020, I co-taught my first SAFe® class. I made a big course Kanban board on the wall with each lesson and designed flip charts for feedback. I printed out the entire trainer guide (trees, RIP) and took physical notes on each page and lesson I was accountable for presenting. I printed and cut out all of the features and stories for the PI Planning simulation, divided up the pennies, and organized the room with pens and sticky notes.

I still have the “business executive” visor I like to show off to friends. Little did we know, those few days teaching that course were our last days in the office together.

In March 2021, I co-taught my first remote SAFe class. I didn’t print out or physically organize a single thing, but I did spend a lot of time preparing: I’d say three to four times as much. This time it was browser tabs, online tools, email messages, and files. And since this was my first teaching environment for any subject in a remote space, I had a lot to learn and explore. 

Luckily, I wasn’t completely alone in my exploration. The SAFe® Community Platform centralized a lot of the resources and information I needed to make the class a success. 

Scaled Agile-provided Preparation

Course enablement. Just as with in-person teaching, mastering the content before teaching it is vital. Listening to SAFe experts discuss the intent of each lesson and subsequently passing the exam was a great (and mandatory) first step.

Remote Trainer Badge. Taking this learning plan helped prime my mind for teaching in a remote context. It gave me confidence and allowed me to see opportunities in teaching remote rather than just its limitations. I got tips from some of SAFe’s best trainers on creative ways to teach, appropriate adjustments, and reframed expectations. For example, even with a pre-course webinar to prepare your students and yourself for the tools and technology to use in class, you should still have a plan A, plan B, and plan C, because anything can happen. 

The SAFe® Virtual Classroom. With Virtual Classroom, I didn’t need to find a collaboration tool, buy a subscription, rebuild all of the activities, and have my students register for it. In one click and with no extra effort, my activities were set. Thank goodness for Virtual Classroom! I could spend my precious time elsewhere instead of tediously recreating activities and adding, copying, and pasting every user story in the PI Planning simulation.

Knowledge-check questions. At the beginning of every trainer guide, there’s a link to a set of quiz questions associated with each lesson written in the style of the certification exam. Right now, it’s still a bit tedious to transfer all of the knowledge-check questions and answers to a polling tool, but this ended up being a highlight for several of our students. It was a great review of each lesson and was a good litmus test to give confidence that the students were learning and retaining information. 

Self-guided Preparation

Reviewing each slide. Getting very comfortable with the content and flow of the course is important to me. This largely means going through each slide and adding notes for stories, metaphors, and analogies—no trees harmed this time. Taking the time to get creative with the content enabled me to set up jokes and prepare realia props to surprise and delight students.

Preparing each activity. This may seem tedious and redundant, but really getting clear on the activities and exactly how they will be performed set both me and my students up for success. The virtual space can be confusing sometimes, so getting crystal clear on resources, breakout rooms, timeboxes, and objectives is key, especially when there are a few ways to run activities. 

Virtual audience engagement research. This means Google searching and YouTube browsing about how to make a remote class effective and fun. I wanted to get suggestions from experts in the general business of video conferencing, from webinars to interactive courses. I learned about alternatives to slide decks, relevant icebreakers, and online tools to keep the class on track. 

Was the class 100% perfect? No. But I went in feeling prepared, taking advantage of several available resources. I took risks and tried new things. And ultimately, I learned from the experience.

I discovered that remote teaching is nothing to be afraid of. For many people like me, it’s simply something new, something different, and something with which to experiment, have fun, and fail fast. In the words of one of my favorite professors, “The best teachers are the ones who try.” So, get caught trying.

About Emma Ropski

Emma Ropski is a certified SAFe 5 Program Consultant and scrum master

Emma is a certified SAFe 5 Program Consultant and scrum master at Scaled Agile. As a lifelong learner and teacher, she loves to illustrate, clarify, and simplify helpful concepts to keep all teammates and students of SAFe engaged.

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Taking the Sting Out of Remote Teaching with Scaled Agile’s Virtual Classroom

The backstory

Scaled Agile’s Virtual Classroom

Due to the global pandemic, almost overnight, we had to convert all 2020 SAFe® classes to virtual delivery. I’m most proud of how the worldwide SAFe community came together and experimented to figure out remote delivery. My contribution was to imagine the class experience and determine how to help instructors facilitate learning activities remotely. We came up with remote training aids which were simple slide templates for each activity that groups could collaborate indirectly. It was an early stage MVP in our journey to evolve remote learning.  

Remote was not for the faint of heart

As instructors, we had to figure out the tooling and how to set up those templates for the class. I remember when I remotely delivered new Lean Portfolio Management Alpha and Beta classes, it took me close to 30 hours to set up the activities and groups for each class. Delivering back-to-back classes, while good for our work, was exhausting because setup activities would bleed into our evenings and weekends. I could definitely understand why some SPCs were hesitant to venture into remote delivery.

The virtual classroom evolution

We kept experimenting with different formats and tools in class, and learning with each one how to make the experience better. We started to use SAFe® Collaborate, our cloud-based visual workspace, to standardize the activity templates. Early feedback was positive about the learning and ideation experience. But attendees still felt that having too many windows open was distracting and tedious, especially during activities with short timeboxes. For instructors, it took time to set up these templates for each group and class. And while we were able to automate a portion of the setup via script, that wasn’t the case for course updates. Instructors still had to revise class activities when Scaled Agile introduced a new class version.

During a hackathon at Scaled Agile, colleagues built an interactive virtual classroom prototype in SAFe Collaborate that solved the navigation and usability challenges. 

This hackathon idea won first place and got approved as a feature during our next PI Planning.  

Scaled Agile’s Virtual Classroom

Virtual classroom for the win

I recently taught my very first class using our virtual classroom, and it was such a wonderful experience. I’ve switched from being a sceptic to a fan because it’s so awesome! All the templates were indexed by lesson, well organized, and easily accessible for both students and teachers. Students could quickly navigate to their own group activity and even browse around to see what other groups were doing.

The learning experience was much richer and more fun for the students, especially when we got to the PI Planning simulation. The best part for me as an instructor? I could set up the class and groups with a single action! I simply showed up to class, clicked a button to designate the number of groups, and started teaching.

Lean Agile Centers of Excellence (LACEs) and SPCs that need to update templates with every course upgrade will score an even bigger win with the virtual classroom experience. Scaled Agile now provides the activity templates and automatically updates them when new course versions are released. This is a huge value and time saver. 

If you’re an SPC or a LACE member, I encourage you to try our virtual classroom in your next class. Just select “SAFe Virtual Classroom” as you set up your next remote class, and explore the different activities. Or, watch the remote trainer enablement video to see a demo.

If you’re like me, you’ll find it hard to go back!

About Deema Dajani

Deema Dajani is a Certified SAFe® Program Cons

Deema Dajani is a Certified SAFe® Program Consultant Trainer (SPCT).
Drawing on her successful startup background and an MBA from Kellogg Northwestern University, Deema helps large enterprises thrive through successful Agile transformations. Deema is passionate about organizing Agile communities for good, and helped co-found the Women in Agile nonprofit. She’s also a frequent speaker at Agile conferences and most recently contributed to a book on business agility.

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Remote I&A at Travelport – Implementing SAFe Remotely

Safe Business Agility

In this ongoing series, we talk to customers about their field experiences working with SAFe ceremonies and implementations of SAFe remotely. This episode with Hilla Knapke, director of enterprise transformation office, and Charles Fleet, VP of transformation from Travelport dives into conducting a fully remote, distributed Inspect & Adapt workshop. They’ll share their thoughts and expectations during preparation, what changed when the event started, what worked, and what they’d improve the next time.

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Visit this link to learn more about the Inspect and Adapt workshop referenced in the podcast:

Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Guest: Hilla Knapke

Hilla Knapke

Hilla Knapke is director, enterprise transformation at Travelport. She executes strategic portfolios while driving business agility into all aspects of business operation through Travelport’s Corporate Development Office. Hilla excels at leading large-scale, technically complex, high-value, strategic global initiatives, unlocking true business agility within organizations. In her personal time, Hilla is a classically trained musician and an avid soccer fan (raising her own favorite goalkeeper); she enjoys hiking, camping and 4x4ing with her husband and children in the beautiful Colorado mountains.

Guest: Charles Fleet

Charles Fleet

Charles Fleet, VP of transformation at Travelport, has more than 15 years of experience leading strategic, global change initiatives. He excels at creating cohesion in disparate teams, overseeing global delivery relationships, and bolstering innovation in program management. Charles lives in Colorado with his wife and two boys, and enjoys running as well as endlessly tinkering on projects around the house.

Stories from the Field: Remote Experiences in Government – Agile in Government

Safe Business Agility

In this ongoing series, our SAFe members, customers, and partners share their real-life stories about their field experiences working with SAFe ceremonies, implementations of SAFe, and business agility. In this episode, we speak with Mark Byers and Dan Montgomery from Octo Consulting—a Scaled Agile partner. They’ll share their experiences working with federal government agencies and contractors in a fully virtual environment, some tips on making this smooth, and some key government trends.

Click the “Subscribe” button to subscribe to the SAFe Business Agility podcast on Apple Podcasts

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Visit these links to learn more about SAFe in the government space referenced in the podcast:

Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Guests: Mark Byers and Dan Montgomery

Mark Byers is the SAFe Practice Lead at Octo Consulting Group, a Scaled Agile Partner. Dan Montgomery is the lead for Octo Consulting’s Agile and DevSecOps Center of Excellence.

Remote ART Launch at Accenture – Business Agility Planning

Safe Business Agility

In this series, we talk to customers about their field experiences with remote SAFe ceremonies and implementations. This episode with Scott Frost, SAFe Fellow, SPCT, and senior business agility transformation coach from Accenture, dives into a fully remote, distributed ART launch.

Click the “Subscribe” button to subscribe to the SAFe Business Agility podcast on Apple Podcasts

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In this series, we talk to customers about this series, we talk to customers about their field experiences with remote SAFe In this series, we talk to customers about their field experiences with remote SAFe ceremonies, SAFe implementations and agility in business. This episode with Scott Frost, SAFe Fellow, SPCT, and senior business agility transformation coach from Accenture, dives into a fully remote, distributed ART launch. He’ll share his thoughts and expectations during preparation, what changed when things got started, what worked, and what he’d recommend improving next time.

Visit these links to learn more about the article and the Community Forum referenced in the podcast:

Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Guest: Scott Frost

Scott Frost is currently a Sr. Business Agility Transformation Coach

Scott Frost is currently a Sr. Business Agility Transformation Coach/Trainer for SolutionsIQ | Accenture. Uniquely positioned as a former IT exec, he works across the value chain from the team to the largest enterprises needing transformation. He has consulted with companies such as Discover Card, Liberty Mutual, ExxonMobil, Invesco, State Farm, AmeriSourceBergen, FedEx, American Express, State Farm, Phillips66 and many more.

Stories from the Field: Remote PI Planning at CVS Health

Safe Business Agility

In this podcast series, we talk to customers about their field experiences with remote SAFe ceremonies and implementations. In this episode, we talk with Rebecca Davis, SPCT at CVS Health and member of the company’s Agile Transformation leadership team, about fully remote, distributed PI Planning at CVS Health.

Click the “Subscribe” button to subscribe to the SAFe Business Agility podcast on Apple Podcasts

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Detail Page

This In this podcast series, we talk to customers about their field experiences with remote SAFe ceremonies and implementations. In this episode, we talk with Rebecca Davis, SPCT at CVS Health and member of the company’s Agile Transformation leadership team, about fully remote, distributed PI Planning at CVS Health.

Visit this link to watch the video referenced in the podcast:

Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Guest: Rebecca Davis

Rebecca Davis is an iSPCT and leader within the Agile Transformation

Rebecca Davis is an iSPCT and leader within the Agile Transformation Office of CVS Health Digital. She helps the people who do the work become empowered, authentic decision makers, while guiding internal SPCs to mature and excel at leading their individual areas.

Elevate Your Remote Production to Super Awesome

SAFe® Program Consultants

The world is now full-on remote! That is, as non-essential workers, we’re all currently working from home. At least until the COVID-19 crisis is behind us and some sense of normalcy returns, we are working in front of screens and lenses. This post is for SAFe® Program Consultants (SPCs) who are actively teaching SAFe courses, and for SAFe Release Train Engineers (RTEs) who are facilitating remote Program Increment (PI)

.

As a consultant for Agile Rising (a Scaled Agile partner), I spend a good portion of my time teaching formal courses on Lean-Agile topics and practices.

With the onslaught of the virus, we were all left scrambling to prepare for the inevitability of not just consulting and coaching remotely but teaching too!

We want the very best for our clients and always strive to relentlessly improve every aspect of our performance.

As it turns out, we were reasonably well-prepared pre-crisis, as one of our enterprise clients was 100-percent work from home as a workforce already. In the months leading up to the pandemic, we had already been planning and testing various tools and techniques to convert our traditional physical classrooms into collaborative virtual environments. It’s a tall order, given that technology, while fascinating and progressing at a fast pace, doesn’t provide the robust exuberances of a well-prepared training room.

So, we researched. We learned, tested, and continue to do so. This post is all about providing a current state of what we’ve tried and what’s proven to work well for us. You could undoubtedly find all of this information on your own. For the weary, read on and see how we’re conducting our courses. The configuration that we share in this article is for a basic, low-budget, at-home studio. You can amp this up to the limits of your budget and beyond.

Please note that in a short time, our friends and partners at Scaled Agile, Inc. have done a tremendous job of putting together high-quality remote aids, guidance, and new versions of the various SAFe courses to suit our new reality. In this post, I aim to cover the latent individual instructor enhancements that you may consider to take your training production to the next level. As one of my dearest friends, Luke Hohmann, would say, “Go with Super Awesome.”

Exploring Super Awesome

The first thing we have to discuss is hardware. And software. And process. Sound familiar? What follows is not an in-depth technical article. This non-treatise is all about super-awesome instruction enhancements for regular people. Engineers, prepare to be bored out of your mind.

Replacing body language over the wire is a huge challenge. What we take for granted in the real world, we cannot expect to happen over a Zoom or chat channel. Our students and customers expect the best from us, and as exemplars, we would put in our due diligence to give them the most value.

The first thing that I notice in lots of online courses is that the instructor (and students) do not share their video feeds. As an instructor, this faux pas is particularly egregious as our students learn in part from our body language. We each have our unique style and way of teaching, and our body language, our movements, and expressions lend credence and variety to our instructions. Without it, our students are getting only a portion of what they usually would in a physical classroom.

In my opinion, the best tools available today that many people are using—such as Zoom, WebEx, BlueJeans, and Microsoft Teams—need a better interface to clearly show the instructor along with the materials.

Color and lighting

Did you notice anything about the screenshot that appeared earlier in this post? I naturally have a tan complexion (and I don’t spray tan) but I looked pretty dark in it, right? Well, I didn’t turn on the panel lights, only a portion of my lighting setup, to show how adding a little bit of light can make a big difference in your presentation. I’m not a pro or even a regular consumer of photography, but even I can see the difference.

Scaled Agile partner

My research led me to some extremes and also reasonable compromises on light choices. I found that you can get away with simple lamps but may wind up having to change bulbs often to suit the specific nature of your at-home studio. I wanted some flexibility, so I purchased these two LED panel lights. These were US$80 each but I can change the color spectrum and brightness—features I wanted for my setup. As a bonus, they come with a great display and simple controls. This capability allows me to adjust the color of the lights to suit my particular skin type. So far, I am super impressed with these lights compared to the other options that I found in the market at the same price range.

I mounted the two panel lights on the wall flanking my primary camera position. Like when I was two years old, I learned quickly that lights create shadows. So, I used a cheap lamp with an LED bulb (5k or more) as a backdrop light to help reduce shadows on my green screen (more on that in a minute).

Notably, the overhead light on my ceiling fan does me no justice—it merely highlights my male pattern baldness to the point of mediocrity. I cried a little, on the inside, when I first noticed it. Key takeaway: unfiltered light is harmful to your video stream (and your appearance).

So, you should experiment with different lighting and positions of the illumination from at least three angles, preferably no unfiltered light from any direction. Use a sheet of printer paper as a cheap filter if you do not invest in a light that comes with a filter.

Natural light, I have read, is excellent, but you need to be able to create distance between your shot and the light source so that you don’t get beams on your face. I have a window in my home office that I covered with easel paper to filter the direct sunlight coming in from the east in the morning. Trust me; you do not want rays of light on your face. Or in an eyeball. Until the end of the story, at least.

Setting the Scene

Once you get the lighting situation wrestled to submission, it is time to tackle pulling all of your content—PowerPoints, video streams, pictures—together into a meaningful presentation. I chose Open Broadcaster Software (OBS)—it’s open and free—as the programming platform on which to experiment. There are commercial software options that you may find on your own, but OBS has worked for me in live events quite well.

Rather than writing a book here to explain the configuration basics of OBS, I created a quick video. I’m not a pro video editor, so please give me some remedial credits for effort.

The Chroma Key (green screen)

Scaled Agile partner

Many video teleconferencing software tools have a virtual green screen feature that allows you to choose pictures or videos for a background. They work ok but can be distracting because the AI doesn’t always frame you correctly in front of the background. And I haven’t found a way in Zoom or Microsoft Teams to adjust overlays or scale with the basic features.

You’ll want to set up a green screen in your studio. Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, quality structured green screen products are hard to find. So I had to adapt a solution using a 6×10 foot muslin green screen and some old-fashioned handyman ingenuity.

With just one trip to a home improvement store and my garage, I got the parts I needed to build a retractable screen.

I used 10 feet of electrical conduit wrapped in a three-quarter-inch schedule 40 PVC pipe and taped the muslin on with regular packing tape. The pipe fits over the conduit and makes a functional scroll so that I can roll up the screen when not needed.

Multicamera angles

As an instructor, you may want some options for different scenes. Perhaps you would like to stand up for some of your instruction in front of a marker board or the SAFe Big Picture. In OBS, as we learned earlier, you can configure different scenes to suit your instruction scenario. I have a scene for sitting down and presenting slides. I have a standup scene set up in front of the green screen. Also, I can use my third camera (a GoPro Hero4) for a wide shot in front of the open wall in my office where I can place the Big Picture, Implementation Roadmap, marker board, etc.

Depending on what material and desired instruction format you prefer, you’ll want to choose an appropriate scene based on your preferences. The goal is to replicate physical interface benefits while minimizing the negatives and enhancing the presentation and instruction quality with virtual capabilities.

I chose the ~US$200 Canon R800 because of its ability to zoom optically/digitally for scene adjustments. I can set the camera up on a tripod in different scenes and zoom to frame the shot correctly. If you choose a non-webcam-based device, you will need a capture card like the AV.io HD. This expensive tool may be avoided by only using your built-in webcam along with an aftermarket webcam (or two or three) that connects via a USB interface.

Sounds of home, at work

Kids screaming in the background. The neighbor is cutting the grass. We’ve all been there, or at least I have.

I love my iMac and MacBook Pro, but the built-in microphones quickly lose effectiveness. Now, imagine me speaking while typing, and you also get to listen to the clickety-click of my keyboard. In essence, I’m forcing my students to suffer from ‘keyboard-mic-itis.’

Give the world a break and invest in a decent aftermarket USB microphone. After a fair amount of research, I chose a kit that comes with the boom and all the accessories to get great, configurable sound.

Of course, the tips and suggestions I’ve included in this post are what work for me. To see what others are doing, check out the Remote SAFe Training forum on the SAFe Community Platform.

Happy teaching!

About Marshall Guillory

Marshall Guillory is director, professional services and government practice at Agile rising

Marshall Guillory is director, professional services and government practice at Agile Rising, and a Scaled Agile SPCT Candidate. He has over 25 years of business experience in software development, information technology, product management, and government fields and sectors. For the past 10+ years, he’s focused on leading digital and organizational transformations.

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Remote PI Planning at Travelport – SAFe for Business Agility

Safe Business Agility

In this new series, we talk to customers about their field experiences with remote SAFe ceremonies and implementations. In this episode with Hilla Knapke, director of enterprise transformation office, and Charles Fleet, VP of transformation, talk about fully remote, distributed. PI Planning with SAFe.

Click the “Subscribe” button to subscribe to the SAFe Business Agility podcast on Apple Podcasts

Share:

In this new series, we talk to customers about their field experiences working with SAFe ceremonies and implementations. This episode with Hilla Knapke, director, enterprise transformation office, and Charles Fleet, VP of transformation from Travelport dives into remote PI Planning. They’ll share their thoughts and expectations during preparation, what changed when the event started, what worked and what they’d improve the next time.

Visit these links to learn more about the article and video referenced in the podcast:

Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Guest: Hilla Knapke

Hilla Knapke

Hilla Knapke is director, enterprise transformation at Travelport. She executes strategic portfolios while driving business agility into all aspects of business operation through Travelport’s Corporate Development Office. Hilla excels at leading large-scale, technically complex, high-value, strategic global initiatives, unlocking true business agility within organizations. In her personal time, Hilla is a classically trained musician and an avid soccer fan (raising her own favorite goalkeeper); she enjoys hiking, camping and 4x4ing with her husband and children in the beautiful Colorado mountains.

Guest: Charles Fleet

Charles Fleet

Charles Fleet, VP of transformation at Travelport, has more than 15 years of experience leading strategic, global change initiatives. He excels at creating cohesion in disparate teams, overseeing global delivery relationships, and bolstering innovation in program management. Charles lives in Colorado with his wife and two boys, and enjoys running as well as endlessly tinkering on projects around the house.

Remote PIs, ARTs, and Teams – Agility in Business

Safe Business Agility

In this deep-dive episode of the SAFe Business Agility podcast, Melissa Reeve, SPC and Inbar Oren, SAFe® Fellow and principal contributor to the Scaled Agile Framework®, explore what it takes to run dispersed and remote PIs, ARTs, and teams.

Click the “Subscribe” button to subscribe to the SAFe Business Agility podcast on Apple Podcasts

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Hosted by: Melissa Reeve

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile

Melissa Reeve is the Vice President of Marketing at Scaled Agile, Inc. In this role, Melissa guides the marketing team, helping people better understand Scaled Agile, the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) and its mission.

Hosted by: Inbar Oren

Inbar Oren a SAFe Fellow and a principal contributor to the Scaled Agile Framework.

Inbar Oren a SAFe Fellow and a principal contributor to the Scaled Agile Framework. He has more than 20 years of experience in the high-tech market, working in small and large enterprises, as well as a range of roles from development and architecture to executive positions. For over a decade, Inbar has been helping development organizations—in both software and integrated systems—improve results by adopting Lean-Agile best practices. Previous clients include Cisco, Woolworths, Amdocs, Intel, and NCR.

Working as a Scaled Agile instructor and consultant, Inbar’s current focus is on working with leaders at the Program, Value Stream, and Portfolio levels to help them bring the most out of their organizations, build new processes and culture.

A martial arts aficionado, Inbar holds black belts in several arts. He also thinks and lives the idea of “scale,” raising five kids—including two sets of twins—with his beautiful wife, Ranit.